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Author: Carola

2016 Reading Stats & Favourites

2016 Reading Stats & Favourites

Okay this is embarrassing. This post has been in my drafts since… well, 2016. And now it’s suddenly March. Anyway, time to look back on 2016, and give you some statistics as well!

I have no idea how I feel about 2016. My year started out horribly, so the only way was up. Minus the first few months, 2016 was a good year for me personally, with plenty of traveling and stability in my professional life. But beyond that, 2016 was rather crap wasn’t it? Politically (but I won’t go into that) as well as seeing all my favourite celebrities pass away, mostly unexpectedly, at ages far too young…

While I won’t say I was angry at the world, I did often give the world the middle finger and stood firmly for what I believe in. One big fuck you was given through my reading. As my personal revenge on the world, this year I have been reading almost exclusively books by and about women, LGBTQIA+ and PoC. When I was reading all the ‘official’ end-of-year lists by the big media, I regretted this not a bit. All lists, both international as well as national, are dominated by white men. I swear, I have yet to encounter a ‘big’ list that is made up of more than 30% women, for starters. How completely unimaginative and lazy. Fuck that.

Anyway! As every year, I set out to read 52 books and was already far ahead early in the year. My reading slowed down in the last quarter of the year as I was just too busy (busy having fun, mostly, no complaining there!). I still ended up reading 77 books.

This is what Goodreads looks like for 2016:


You can see all the books I read in 2016 here, or you can take a look at my Goodreads Year in Books.

And here are my reading stats for 2016:

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October & November wrap-up

October & November wrap-up

Monthly wrap-upI am seriously neglecting this blog. I have been thinking (but not too often) about what I want to do with the blog and for now I am okay with the way it is. Life is happening, and it’s all good, and that’s okay.

So I will drop wrap-ups here now and then and I will of course do my long end-of-year wrap-up. I am reading and have in the past days met my goal of 75 books this year, so enough food for that end-of-year wrap-up in a few weeks!

Read in October

  1. God’s Boat by Kaori Ekuni
  2. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
  3. Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta
  4. The Teahouse Fire by Ellis Avery

Read in November

  1. Affinity by Sarah Waters
  2. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
  3. Bij ‘t graf van een denker by J. Groneman

October was The Literary Others. I was going to participate actively, but alas. I did host a giveaway over at Roofbeamreader’s, and was lucky enough to win a book myself. I ended up reading 4 books (but finished the last one in November), and all were amazing!

November was just a whole lot of eh. I started reading Cixin Liu’s Death’s End, the last volume in the Remembrance of Earth’s Past series. That was a slow read and took up most of my November.

Reading for the rest of 2016
I have finished my Goodreads challenge of reading 75 books. I am now trying to finish my current book, Queer: A Graphic History. I also plan to pick up Haruki Murakami’s Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World and my Christmas read will be Jeanette Winterson’s Christmas Days: 12 Stories and 12 Feasts for 12 Days. The last two+ weeks of the year are looking very busy, so who knows if I’ll even manage to finish these three books!

September wrap-up

September wrap-up

Monthly wrap-upWe’ve been enjoying a near perfect Indian summer here in the Netherlands, which has really lifted my spirits. I’ve found back some of my motivation and started studying again. I started a Korean language course, and am also working on Japanese again (mostly by reading). It feels good to be excited about something again.

As for reading: it’s clear I still had to let my foot heal the past month, hah. I wish I could’ve enjoyed more activities (active activities) outside to properly enjoy the lovely weather, but alas. That’s the one thing I’m pretty bummed about, looking back at September. My foot is slowly getting better though, hopefully it’ll be all fine within a few weeks, and in the mean time I’ve enjoyed a ton of reading.

Read in September

  1. The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin
  2. Short Stories from Hogwarts of Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies (Pottermore Presents, #1) by J.K. Rowling
  3. Short Stories from Hogwarts of Power, Politics and Pesky Poltergeists (Pottermore Presents, #2) by J.K. Rowling
  4. 女仙 by Ryūnosuke Akutagawa
  5. 日記帳 by Rampo Edogawa
  6. The Book of Tea by Kakuzō Okakura
  7. Breaking Into Japanese Literature: Seven Modern Classics in Parallel Text edited by Giles Murray
  8. Hogwarts: An Incomplete and Unreliable Guide (Pottermore Presents, #3) by J.K. Rowling
  9. by Kanoko Okamoto
  10. Good Morning, Midnight by Jean Rhys
  11. Tegenspel (Een groene bloem #2) by Floortje Zwigtman
  12. Spiegeljongen (Een groene bloem #3) by Floortje Zwigtman

Phew! I am now at 66 books read in 2016. This past month I read a few short story collections, plenty of Japanese (all short stories), but also a couple of longer books. I read Good Morning, Midnight for #ReadingRhys, and I finished a wonderful Dutch LGBT+ YA series. I wish it had been translated to English, but no luck 🙁

Reading in October
In October I am joining Roof Beam Reader‘s The Literary Others event! I am very excited about it. I will be reading nothing but LGBT+ books this month. The last time this event was held was back in 2012, and my posts are still up (click!). I just picked my first book for the month, Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta. No idea what else I’ll end up picking up this month.. yet 🙂

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Favourite Albums

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Favourite Albums

Top Ten Tuesday This week’s Top Ten Tuesday is themed All About Audio. I could talk about audio books, but the truth is, I rarely listen to them (mostly because I get too distracted too easily).

So instead, I’ll introduce you to my ten all-time favourite albums. Thing is, I am a huge music lover, even though I rarely talk about it here. Music was my first love, and it will probably be my last 😉 I keep an archive of all the shows I’ve seen over the years here for anyone interested. Much of it is Japanese music, but there is some western rock and symphonic metal around too.

Picking ten favourite albums, all-time favourite albums, is like forcing me to chose which body part I’d most like to chop off. It may possibly be even worse than picking ten all-time favourite books haha. So I cheated, badly 😛 Anyway, all these albums are available on Spotify, and I’ll give alternative recommendations when they aren’t!

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[Review] Breaking Into Japanese Literature

[Review] Breaking Into Japanese Literature

[Review] Breaking Into Japanese LiteratureBreaking Into Japanese Literature: Seven Modern Classics in Parallel Text by Giles Murray, Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, Natsume Sōseki
Published by Kodansha on June 1st 2012
Genres: Japanese literature, Horror, Classic
Pages: 239
ISBN: 9781568364155
Goodreads
three-stars

Reading great books in the original should be the culmination of language study, but reading Japanese literature unassisted is a daunting task that can defeat even the most able of students. Breaking into Japanese Literature is designed to help you bypass all the frustration and actually enjoy classics of Japanese literature.
Breaking into Japanese Literature features seven graded stories by Natsume Soseki and Akutagawa Ryunosuke, covering a variety of genres.

This book was… not that great. But let me start off on a positive note: I enjoyed the stories. The book contains seven short stories in total, by Natsume Sōseki and Ryūnosuke Akutagawa. The selection of stories, content wise, is good. The stories are quite dark, which I love, and I especially like Akutagawa, so reading these stories wasn’t boring.

Now for the negative…

The aim of this book is to read Japanese literature in the original language. The book is set up to accommodate this: each page contains the original Japanese story on the left page, an English translation on the right page, and vocabulary on the bottom half of both pages. Sounds convenient, but it doesn’t quite get it right. There are no grammar explanations, and the English translations are not 100% literal translations either. The same vocab is repeated every page when necessary, which is convenient but also makes you lazy. On the plus side, there are free audio downloads available for each of the stories, if you like to listen to them while reading (I haven’t downloaded them, so I don’t know if the quality is any good).

The stories themselves are, honestly, too difficult for a book like this. They are separated into three different levels: the first stories are the easiest (and of a pretty good level), and then they gradually become more difficult. They are classic stories, and many use words and kanji that are no longer in use. The same goes for some of the grammar. And the grammar and vocabulary was simply too difficult on the whole. It doesn’t help that there are no grammar explanations in sight and the translations don’t always help with that either (you will get the meaning of the sentence, but you still won’t understand the actual grammar). For me the stories were readable, but I’d judge them as high N2 going up to N1 level.

This book simply doesn’t help anyone ‘break into’ Japanese literature. If you don’t have any prior experience reading Japanese literature in Japanese, this is way too hard. And if you are advanced enough to read stories of this level, there are better choices out there. All of the stories in this book have already been published in English (parts of Soseki’s Ten Nights Dreaming, Akutagawa’s Rashomon, In the Grove, The Nose..), so if you want to read something new and previously untranslated, this is not a great selection of stories.

All in all, a nice book for reading practice at N2+ level. But before buying this book I’d recommend Read Real Japanese Fiction, which is set up better, more accessible level-wise, and has a wider selection of stories (and all of them previously untranslated). If you are looking for more difficult reading material, you might want to check Aozora Bunko instead.